Music for Speech Therapy

music-and-speech-therapy

Music can be a motivating source for many children to participate in therapy sessions.  As speech therapists, we can use songs to assess receptive language and comprehension as well as elicit more expressive language.

How to use music for speech therapy:

  • 1.  Pre-teach skills/vocabulary
  • 2.  Sing the song
  • 3.  Follow-up with post activities such as questions

The melody can often times be too quick to follow.  Pause frequently during the song to allow children to respond/participate in a manner similar to a cloze procedure.  This will enable children to actively learn new vocabulary as well as the meaning behind the lyrics of the song.

Click below to see a list of songs with iTunes/Amazon links.  We have included some downloadable materials that can be used before, during, and after some of the songs.  Printable materials are labeled based on goals that can be targeted, but keep in mind that all activities can be modified to target any number of speech/language goals.

ASHA has also included an article in their blog on the Do’s and Don’t of Using Music for Speech Therapy

Materials and Music for Speech Therapy

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