What is a Speech Disorder?

A speech disorder refers to a problem with the actual production of sounds, whereas a language disorder refers to a difficulty understanding or putting words together to communicate ideas.

Speech disorders include:

  • Articulation disorders: difficulties producing sounds in syllables or saying words incorrectly to the point that listeners can’t understand what’s being said.
  • Fluency disorders: problems such as stuttering, in which the flow of speech is interrupted by abnormal stoppages, repetitions (st-st-stuttering), or prolonging sounds and syllables (ssssstuttering).
  • Resonance or voice disorders: problems with the pitch, volume, or quality of the voice that distract listeners from what’s being said. These types of disorders may also cause pain or discomfort for a child when speaking.
  • Dysphagia/oral feeding disorders: these include difficulties with drooling, eating, and swallowing.

For a complete list of speech disorders click here.

Language disorders can be either receptive or expressive:

  • Receptive disorders: difficulties understanding or processing language.
  • Expressive disorders: difficulty putting words together, limited vocabulary, or inability to use language in a socially appropriate way.

What is Speech Therapy?

Speech-language therapy (commonly called “speech therapy”) focuses on helping people become more independent with their ability to communicate with others. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), often informally known as speech therapists, are professionals educated in the study of human communication, its development, and its disorders. All of our SLPs hold at least a master’s degree and the Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA).

Are you in need of speech therapy or more information on speech therapy?

If you have questions about speech disorders we are here to help. Contact us today. Our speech therapy programs start with a comprehensive evaluation in order to determine the area(s) of focus and the specific goals and objectives. Our evaluations include trial therapy to form impressions about how a child will respond to treatment.

Our SLPs are specialists at guiding all aspects of the therapy process. They choose WHAT to work on (i.e., targets), HOW it should be worked on (i.e., cues/strategies), and WHY it should be addressed (i.e., rationale).  Taking into account the age and interests of the patient, they use motivating activities and rewards. They develop unique programs based on the latest research to achieve the fastest progress possible.

Know that you are not alone.

Approximately one-in-ten children develop differently than their peers and may need support.  Contact us today.

Additional resources:

Communication for a Lifetime  -ASHA.org

Speech and Communication Disorders – HealthFinder.gov

AddictionResource.com raises awareness for the consequences of addiction and helps communities become drug-free.

HealthFinder.gov promotes better health through education and awareness.

Communication Disorders Resources for Parents

Help get the word out and support your families by linking to this page.

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